How do I compile OpenAL from CVS? Print
Written by Jonas   
Tuesday, 10 January 2006
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How do I compile OpenAL from CVS?
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The OpenAL library is responsible for generating spatial (3D) audio. On Windows, there is a well-maintained version of OpenAL (see download area). The Linux version has unfortunately often proven to be lagging behind. As if that weren't enough, distributions tend to include older versions of the library.

This article is currently out of date, as the OpenALteam has switched to subversion.


Pulling from CVS

So if we want to have the most up-to-date version of OpenAL, we have to pull it directly from CVS and compile it ourselves. This is done with the following commands:
$ cvs -d:pserver: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it :/usr/local/cvs-repository login
(when you are asked for a password, enter "guest")
$ cvs -d:pserver: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it :/usr/local/cvs-repository co portable
This will pull the most recent version ("HEAD") from OpenAL's central CVS server. As this is the development branch of OpenAL, there might be problems compiling the package. If you wish to get a specific known-to-work version, you should specify a tag, e.g.:
$ cvs -d:pserver: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it :/usr/local/cvs-repository co -r Linux_Spec1-0 portable
Here are the relevant current CVS tags (copied from the OpenAL homepage):
  • HEAD contains the latest 1.1 code for all implementations (not guaranteed buildable or complete)
  • Linux_Spec1-0 for the last Linux code before the transition towards OpenAL 1.1 began
  • MacOSX1-2_Spec1-0 for the last MacOS X code before the transition towards OpenAL 1.1 began
  • Win1-1-2_Spec1-0 for the last Windows code before the transition towards OpenAL 1.1 began
  • MACOSX_DevelopmentBranch for the OS X development branch
You can either pull portable as in the commands above, or openal. The former is a subset of the OpenAL distribution with only the files relevant for compiling on UNIX-like systems (Linux, Solaris, MacOS X). This FAQ relates to portable.


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